HP 9845 complete system on auction in Sweden

Paul Berger phb.hfx at gmail.com
Fri Sep 29 13:00:05 CDT 2017



On 2017-09-29 2:02 PM, Ed via cctalk wrote:
> Cory - good  suggestion about the double sided  tape.
>   
> what  was the orig. bonding material between   face glass  and  tube? just
> curious....
> Ed#
On my 9835A it was Canadian Balsam a common optical bonding material.   
I bonded the shield on my to the front of the case using epoxy.  I had 
tried tape but it slowly settled to the bottom of the case, I guess my 
tape was not thick enough.  In a very old TV I once had there was just a 
sheet of plate  glass set into the front of the cabinet in front of a 
tube that did not have any implosion protection.

Paul.
>   
>   
> In a message dated 9/26/2017 5:29:30 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
> coryheisterkamp at gmail.com writes:
>
>   
>   
>
> It's the understood chemical decomposition of the  adhesive that holds the
> screen shield to the CRT.  It's pretty much  inevitable, from what I
> understand.  The solution is to separate the  shield from the CRT, clean the face
> of the CRT and reattach the  shield.  Some people don't reattach it, and some
> people think they are  risking serious injury - no opinion. Will the newer
> adhesives hold up  better?  We hope so.  -- Ian
>
> --
>
> Ian S. King,  MSIS, MSCS, Ph.D. Candidate
> The Information School
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> A common trick amongst TV collectors with the  large 23" round CRTs is to
> carefully remove the tube and place it face down in  a kiddy pool of lukewarm
> water. Let it sit an hour or two in the sun and the  faceplate will slide
> right off.
>
>
> To re-adhere the glass after cleaning, one technique is  to use double
> sided foam tape on the face around the perimeter; similar  thickness to the
> original PVA and holds well, especially if under slight  compression once the
> tube is reinstalled.  -C
>



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