Systems based on Fairchild 9440 / 9445

bfranchuk at jetnet.ab.ca bfranchuk at jetnet.ab.ca
Tue Nov 4 17:56:07 CST 2008


Brent Hilpert wrote:
> Robert Borsuk wrote:
>   
>> On Nov 3, 2008, at 11:15 PM, Brent Hilpert wrote:
>>
>>     
>>> Amazing, I'm wondering whether it's another instance of Fairchild
>>> missing the
>>> boat in the microproc era, or, as Chuck is suggesting, they were
>>> high-end
>>> enough that they were limited to the military market
>>>       
>> Don't know if you guys found this but I did find one computer reference.
>>
>> http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?c=196
>>
>> and the data sheet on bit savers for the chips(thank you Al).
>>
>> If your wondering, I was looking for information on a Strobe Data Hawk
>> board and happen to go the the simulogics web site.  The have a
>> product called reNOVAte which happens to emulate the Strobe Data board
>> and the 9440 / 9445 Microprocessor.  Having never heard of that micro,
>> the hunt was on.
>>
>> Don't you love these little distractions?
>>     
>
> Just to put some dates on it, looking more closely at the IC Master I have
> here, the 9440 is stated to have been available in early 1978, while the 9445
> followed in late 1980. So the 9440 was successful enough that Fairchild saw fit
> to produce the 9445 follow-on.
>
> In that datasheet from bitsavers there are schematics (pg29-32) for a full
> switches-and-blinkenlights front panel for the 9445! Funny to see that for a
> microproc in 1982, presumably some legacy from the minicomputer origins.
>
> --
>
> I haven't looked into it in depth but it has been a point of interest to me as
> to how Fairchild fell from grace in the 1980s: failing to produce a strong
> contender in the microproc arena?, betting the farm on the wrong technology
> (high-performance bipolar/I3L instead of CMOS?, too focussed on the high-end
> military market?, too much brain drain to other companies? ...
>
> The counterpoint is how Motorola has managed to adapt and stay on the forefront
> of technology since it's inception producing car radios in the 1920's.
>
>   
but since MAC no longers use a 68000 style cpu, you just have NO-Comment 
cpu clones
for buggy computer designs.




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