CDC Remote Calculator, circa 1965

David Griffith dgriffi at cs.csubak.edu
Thu Apr 23 00:43:39 CDT 2009


On Wed, 22 Apr 2009, derschjo at msu.edu wrote:

> Quoting "Chuck Guzis" <cclist at sydex.com>:
>
>> Ad for a CDC 6600 remote calculator terminal on ePay, item
>> 390046087434.
>>
>> Has anyone seen one of these in the flesh, or was this a trial
>> balloon that never flew?
>
> Ha! "Cloud Computing," (my current least-favorite buzzword...) circa 
> 1965 :).  What's old is new once again.  I'd love a higher-res scan of 
> that so I can read the text...
>
> Love the display on that unit, too.

Notice the accoustic coupler in the top-left, bottom-left, and 
bottom-right.

Here's what I make of the text:

The Control Data Remote Calculator is an amazing new tool developed for 
you.  It enables many scientists, mathematicians and statisticians to 
simultanously use the CONTROL DATA(R) 6600 - the world's most powerful 
computer - to get quick answers to problems stated in mathematical 
language.  At the same time it frees the user from frustrating 
conventions, programming intermediaries and tedious waiting.  This 
culmination of power and convenience broadens your horizons - encourages 
experimentation, innovation and creativity.

Up to 2000 calculators can be installed remotely via standard telephone 
channels through the common-user dial network.  Calculators can operate 
concurrently with normal processing and other types of remote terminals. 
This flexibility along with compact portability enables the calculator to 
be used for "homework".  Whether at home or office, the user merely 
queries the computer from the calculator keyboard containing all 
conventional mathematical functions and symbols.  Answers are shot back on 
the calculator's display panel.

Powerful computer system, and the means for people to get at them the 
moment they need to, account for today's preference for Control Data 
computer systems in scientific research and development.  Talk over your 
requirements with your Control Data representative.  Or write our 
Minneapolis address, Dept 5-725.

-- 
David Griffith
dgriffi at cs.csubak.edu

A: Because it fouls the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
A: Top-posting.
Q: What is the most annoying thing in e-mail?


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